BIOL 309 (Fall)

Mathematical Models in Biology



Instructor(s):
L. Glass (Dept. of Physiology)
McIntyre, Rm. 1118
(514) 398-4338
glass@cnd.mcgill.ca
Workload:
3 credits (3-0-6)
Prerequisite(s):
1 year of calculus; an additional course in Calculus is also recommended; or permission of instructor.
Content:
The main objective is to give the student basic skills necessary to understand the ways mathematics can be applied to study biological systems.

1)  FINITE DIFFERENCE EQUATIONS IN BIOLOGY (12 lectures)  dynamics in 1-dimensional finite difference equations modeling ecosystems including concepts of steady states, cycles and chaos.  Boolean switching networks as applied to genetic regulation. Cellular automata and fractals.

2)  DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (14 lectures)

One dimensional differential equations modeling growth and decay in biology. Second order linear and nonlinear differential equations modeling ecological, biochemical, and compartmental systems in biology. Stability analysis of first and second order nonlinear differential equations. Phase plane analysis of nonlinear second order differential equations.
       
Readings:
   
Understanding Nonlinear Dynamics by Daniel Kaplan & Leon Glass (Springer-Verlag, 1995)
   
Method:
   
2 1/2 hours lecture per week.
   
   
Evaluation:
   

Critical review of a scientific article, homework, class test, final.


McGill University values academic integrity. Therefore all students must understand the meaning and consequences of cheating, plagiarism and other academic offences under the Code of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Procedures (see http://www.mcgill.ca/integrity/ for more information).

Last update: March 21, 2017