BIOL 115 (Fall)

Essential Biology


Instructor(s):
S. Woolley N4/8 (514) 398-23.24 sarah.woolley@mcgill.ca
J. Vogel Bellini 269 (514) 398-5880 jackie.vogel@mcgill.ca
Workload:
3 credits (3-0-6)
Prerequisite(s):
Not open to those who have had BIOL 111 OR BIOL 112, or equivalents
Content:

In this course, we will learn about living organisms at a variety of levels, from molecules to populations. Since Biology is an enormous field, it is impossible to cover it completely in a single course. As a consequence, this course will address five fundamental themes (see below). Within those themes, an effort will be made to relate the facts presented to pressing matters in our daily lives. For instance, when we discuss genetics we will talk about genetic engineering and its impact on society. This approach means that the course will tend to be topical, focusing on interesting observations and trying to explain them on the basis of biological knowledge

MODULE 1: SCIENCE & LIFE (Vogel)
Biology - Life & Diversity
Intro to the Scientific Method
Chemistry & Molecules of Life

MODULE 2: CELL BIOLOGY (Vogel)
Cell Function & Structure
Enzymes & Metabolism
Cellular Respiration
Carbon Flow & Photoynthesis

MODULE 3: GENETICS, CANCER & BIOTECHNOLOGY (Vogel)
DNA Structure, Replication & Forensics
Genes, Proteins & Gene Regulation
Cell Cycle, Mitosis, Cell Division
Checkpoints, Mutations & Cancer
Meiosis, Sex & Chromosomal Abnormalities
Mendelian
Complex Inheritance & Human Genetics
Stem Cells, Cell Differentiation & Development

MODULE 4: NEUROSCIENCE & BEHAVIOUR (Woolley)
How does the brain work?
Brain in Action: the fiction of memorye

MODULE 5: EVOLUTION (Woolley)
Fundamentals of Evolution: Natural Selection, Sexual Selection, Drift & Speciation
Evolution and You: Bacteria and Viruses, Global Change, Human Evolution

 

Readings:
Belk and Maier “Biology; Science for Life with physiology” 5th edition (earlier editions are also acceptable), Pearson
(Note: subject to change; do not purchase before receiving course syllabus)
Method:
Two 1.5 hour lectures per week.
Evaluation:

Two one-hour midterm exams. Written assignments. Three-hour final exam.

 

 
McGill University values academic integrity. Therefore all students must understand the meaning and consequences of cheating, plagiarism and other academic offences under the Code of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Procedures (see http://www.mcgill.ca/integrity/ for more information).

Last update: March 19, 2019