Lac Hertel

Fussmann Lab
Department of Biology

Research Assistants and Technicians

Gregory Kramer

Research Assistant
Stewart Biology Building, W6/3
Phone: 514-398-4096
e-mail: gKrames@hotmail.com

I graduated with a BSc. in Biology from McGill University in 2005 and have now gone back to school for a degree in Mechanical Engineering.

After completing an independent studies project with Professor Fussmann in 2004, I was fortunate enough to be able to work as a research assistant in his lab on a wide variety of projects. Our work on mixis in the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus was recently published in Fussmann, Kramer & Labib (2007).

Current projects include food web dynamics as well as various competition experiments.

Apart from helping the other research assistants and students with experimental set-up and execution, I am responsible for equipment maintenance and general handy work around the lab.

[top of page]

Katherine Priestley

Research Assistant
Stewart Biology Building, W6/3
Phone: 514-398-4096
e-mail: katherine_priestley@hotmail.com

I started working in the Fussmann lab as an undergraduate independent studies student. I am now a Diploma in Environment student at the McGill School of the Environment and have recently rejoined the Fussmann lab as a part-time research assistant.

My first project examined competition between two rotifer species for a single food source.

Since then I have had the chance to get involved in a number of other projects, including food web studies and even some molecular work.

These opportunities to assist each other on such a variety of topics are part of what makes working in this lab so enjoyable!

[top of page]

Mahmoud Labib

Research Assistant
Stewart Biology Building, W6/3
Phone: 514-398-4096
e-mail: mahmoud.labib@gmail.com

I am interested in the mixis behaviour in rotifers.

I mainly work with the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus in which mixis is elicited by a factor that is produced by females when a culture reaches a density threshold. This work was recently published in Fussmann, Kramer & Labib (2007).

I am also interested in molecular ecology. I am currently working on finding genetic markers between clones of Brachionus calyciflorus, which are morphologically indistinguishable, by carrying out restriction enzyme analysis and RFLP analysis.

Once these markers are found, we will be able to follow the ecological dynamics of a rotifer populations made up of clones that are morphologically indistinguishable.

Watch my rotifer movie: ( 0:46 min ), ( v.11; 3.2 MB), ( 3.2 MB ), on YouTube

[top of page]

Emily Redmond

Research Assistant
Stewart Biology Building, W6/3
Phone: 514-398-4096
e-mail: emily.redmond@gmail.com

I joined the lab in 2006 for my Undergraduate Independent Studies project.

I used protein allozyme analysis as a method to identify different strains of Brachionus calyciflorus in experimental cultures.

In conclusion, DNA-based methods are probably superior when it comes to quantification of clonal frequencies. However, I was able to show that even moderate levels of genetic diversity can have drastic effects on the population dynamics.

In the summer of 2007 I re-joined the lab and will try to refine molecular methods to track rotifer clonal frequencies in mixed cultures.

[top of page]

Mark Fox

Research Technician 2005-2006
Stewart Biology Building, W6/3
Phone: 514-398-4096

[top of page]