Area of Research: Evolution



 


"Polyphenism is the ability of a single genome to produce two or more alternative morphologies in response to an environmental cue. A classical example can be found in Daphnia pulex - if predators of Daphnia are absent, individuals develop a rounded head. If predators are present, however, individuals develop a spine on their head for protection. By studying the evolutionary and developmental basis of polyphenisms, we take one step closer to understanding how the environment interacts with the genome, and how this interaction may generate morphological diversity."
(Dr. Ehab Abouheif)

Faculty Members

Abouheif
Barrett
Bell
Bermingham
Bureau
Carroll
Chapman
Collin
Cristescu
Green

Hargreaves
Hendry
Herre
Larsson
*Lechowicz
Lefebvre
Reader
Schoen

 

*No longer accepting Graduate Students